Waring Pro Breakfast Express  Belgian Waffle & Omelet Maker WMR 30000 BKD. The Waring Pro Brushed Stainless Steel Nonstick Breakfast Express Plus, Designed To Whip Up A Waffle & Omelet At The Same Time. It's A Kitchen Essential For Novices & Seasoned Cooks Alike This Unit Has 2 LED Lights & Audio Beep Tones To Indicate When The Waffle  Or Omelet Is Done.Also Great For Pancakes, Frittatas, Fried Eggs, English Muffins, Grilled  Cheese. Rotary Features Ensures Even Baking On Top & Bottom. Two Thermostat & Browning Control Knobs. Brand New & Never Used In Original Box. Dimensions Of Are 12 Lbs, & 4.5 Oz / 17"L x 11.5 " W x 11" H. Selling This Item For $ 120.00 
The red Power light comes on when the waffle baker is plugged in. This light will stay on until the unit is unplugged. The green Preheat light comes on when the waffle baker has reached the desired temperature and is ready for waffle batter. Check for doneness when steaming slows. Most waffle batter cooks in 5 to 8 minutes, making for a quick meal with easy clean up.
“My husband and I love Belgian waffles. Over the past 20 years, you would not believe how many waffle-makers I have purchased. Some were good, and others were just terrible. My new All-Clad Belgian Waffle Maker makes perfect Belgian waffles. It is on the pricey side, but obviously worth every penny. I wish I had found it years earlier. The waffles that are perfect for us are crunchy on the outside and soft on the inside, and the color is a golden brown. I was able to achieve this on setting No. 5. I like to use King Arthur Flour Belgian Waffle Mix. The resulting waffles are outstanding.”
Out of all our picks, the Krups is the only one that can feed a large group efficiently, producing four 1-inch-thick, 4½-inch square waffles at a time. But its shape also works for feeding just one or two people. As Will It Waffle? author Daniel Shumski pointed out, “You can always make four at a time if you want, or you could make fewer, or you could make four, freeze two.” Neither our runner-up nor our budget picks offer that option, since they make waffles that are big enough to serve only one or two people at a time.

We’ve covered plenty of brunch-worthy appliances and tchotchkes in the past, including a waffle iron for Instagram-worthy waffles, eggcups à la Call Me by Your Name, the best French presses and pour-overs, and even skillets to make the perfect Chez Panisse–style eggs. Here, we’re doing a deep dive into the best waffle-makers available on Amazon. (Note that reviews have been edited for length and clarity.) 

This was the first waffle iron I've ever bought and I'm extremely happy with it. I've read some other reviews complaining about how it doesn't have a timer or other fancy gadget but for me that is only a benefit. I'll be the first to admit that I'm not great with technology but this waffle iron was so simple and easy. And I don't mind setting my own timer---in fact I prefer doing that as I've been greatly disappointed with automated equipment in the past.
As always, though, with any kitchen appliance, user reviews are king because they tell how the appliance does under real-world conditions with a real person at the helm -- and how long they hold up under that real-world use. Combining all those terrific resources with our own kitchen experience led us to our recommendations for the waffle irons that are easiest to use and clean, and, of course, make a perfect waffle.
If you can’t find the Krups GQ502D, we recommend turning to the Chef’sChoice WafflePro Classic Belgian (840B), which makes a Belgian-style round waffle that’s somewhat thinner than the results from our top pick. This model was the top pick in our original guide, for good reason: It bakes waffles evenly to a wide range of doneness levels (with some exceptions; see below), plus it has an alarm to alert you when the plates are sufficiently heated and the waffle is ready. However, it also has a couple of minor drawbacks, and those dropped it to the number-two slot.
Makes nice, crispy waffles, and you don't need nonstick spray. The only thing I don't like is it doesn't have an indicator when waffles are done, so you have to keep checking. My old iron had a preheat light that would turn off when ready, and would turn back on when waffles were done. This iron lights up to show its plugged in, and a random green light that turns on whenever that serves no apparent purpose (maybe that it's done preheating?). Even the manual that came with it states there's no indicator for when waffles are done. Anyway, I don't use very often, and it does make waffles, which is what it's suppose to do.
The Krups GQ502D took a little more time than some of the other models we tested to bake waffles. In our tests, waffles typically took about seven or eight minutes to cook, while the Presto FlipSide, for one, cooked a thicker waffle in about half the time. But the machines that cooked faster also tended to overcook, or to develop hot spots. A few extra minutes of waiting time is a small price to pay for golden, even-toned waffles, and the wait isn’t so bad when you can make four waffles at once.

The versatile four-waffle size allows you to feed large or small crowds, but this sturdy machine is still relatively compact, and it can easily store vertically or horizontally. Not only is it about the same price as our former top pick, the Proctor Silex 26016A (which is no longer being manufactured), it even feels of better quality and comes with more great features.
If our main pick sells out, we also like the Chef’sChoice WafflePro Classic Belgian (840B), our original top pick, which performs just as well as the Krups—but only with thick batter, which makes it less flexible in practice. It also produces fewer waffles at a time than the Krups, but it does have a wide range of doneness settings, and it will beep when your waffles are ready.
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