Hamilton Beach® Waffle Makers are designed for quick cleanup, and in select models, an overflow channel, nonstick coating, and pre-measured batter cup all help prevent messy spills. Nonstick surfaces are easy to clean with a damp cloth, and select models take convenience one step further with removable, dishwasher safe grids for the easiest cleanup imaginable.


Traditional waffle irons are attached to tongs with wooden handles and are held over an open flame, or set on a stove. Most modern waffle irons are self-contained tabletop electrical appliances, heated by an electric heating element controlled by an internal thermostat. There are also two variants of the electric iron: one with removable plates and ones with non-removable plates.[2] Professional waffle makers are usually made of cast iron whereas domestic models are often teflon coated. Many have a light that goes off when the iron is at the set temperature. Most modern waffle irons - particularly cast aluminum ones - are coated with a non-stick coating (e.g. teflon) to prevent the waffles from sticking to them. Cast-iron waffle makers are usually not coated and require seasoning like a cast-iron frying pan.
“Leslie Knope is my spirit animal, as I am completely obsessed with waffles, and I am a little bit crazy just like her. She would love this waffle iron, but then she would probably trash it after one use because she would be scared of putting JJ’s Diner out of business. Thankfully, I don’t have a JJ’s Diner near me, and I like to make my own waffles. I can see Jerry/Larry/Garry Gengurch buying this waffle iron for Leslie Knope, and the mockery that would follow the next day as Leslie and the entire office would blame Jerry/Larry/Garry for putting JJ’s Diner in danger.
I searched everywhere. I unsuccessfully raided the kitchen cupboards with the hope I’d find the recipe scribbled on an index card splattered in batter. After months of searching, I finally found it in the turquoise journal I filled with recipe notes from when I wrote the book. Somewhere between cacao percentages and the perfect crumb-to-apple ratio on a crumble was a nonchalantly scribbled list of ingredients for this gilt-edged Belgian waffles recipe.

If picture-perfect waffles are a must-have, then this flip model is the pick for you. The flip function makes it easy to distribute the batter from edge to edge, without worrying about overflow. The Cuisinart waffle maker heats up and cooks waffles fast, producing a crisp outer shell and fluffy interior. Its heavy plates heat evenly and retain the heat well, so batch after batch of waffles turns out consistently browned. This iron quickly makes two large waffles at a time and reheats rapidly, so it can handle a lot of growling stomachs. This model also features an on/off switch, allowing you to always have it set up on your counter for waffles on the fly.
For our original testing, we assembled a panel of seven tasters. We made at least two rounds of Bisquick waffles and one round of yeast-raised waffles in each model. Rather than judge the time it took for the machines to heat up and cook, we focused on how good a waffle each maker produced. At first we followed the indicators to determine when the waffles were done, and if a machine had no indicator, we waited for it to stop steaming, as Matt Maichel suggested. We allowed for flexibility in cooking time, so if one needed more time, we would shut the lid and let it cook a little longer.
One of the most important attributes of a waffle maker is how well its nonstick coating works—there’s nothing worse than trying to clean stuck-on waffle from those narrow cracks. Luckily, waffles popped out easily from the Krups GQ502D with the aid of silicone tongs or chopsticks, even on the one or two occasions when opening the lid took a little prying. The manual recommends oiling the plates just once each time you use the machine, and we found that this step was more than enough to keep waffles from sticking, even through many rounds of batter. Best of all, the waffle plates detach from the machine, so once they’re cool you can pop them in the sink and wash them with soap and water, or, according to the manufacturer, even run them through the dishwasher. This is so much easier than cleaning most of the other machines we tried, including our former top pick, which requires you to wipe down the plates still in the machine with first a soapy cloth and then a damp one; inevitably, some soap seems to cling stubbornly in the cracks. But only two other machines we tested—the Nordic Ware stovetop model and Black+Decker’s brand-new (as of 2016) Removable Plate Waffle Maker, model WM700R—featured removable plates, and both fell far short of the Krups in ease of use and quality of waffles.
I've made this recipe dozens of times and they've turned out excellent! Great consistency, crispy on the outside, soft and fluffy on the inside. Not greasy at all. However, it is true that they are very sweet, but I reduce the amount of sugar to around 1/2 cup on days where I'm not feeling like overly sweet stuff. I highly recommend using salted butter for the batter and for oiling the waffle iron. If you follow the recipe to the T, then avoid using sweet toppings. Use things like sour raspberries or strawberries with whipped cream that isnt too sweet along with a glass of orange juice or something. or just eat it alone.

The team at Groom+Style hope you found this review useful to your decision-making process – we can smell the waffles cooking in the kitchen already!  If by chance you are also looking for replacement pots and pans feel free to continue reading the teams review of the top 5 best saucepan and pots.  Or probably a better option is to buy a quality home ice cream maker, because what’s better than waffles and ice cream?


The ones we definitely tend to avoid are the machines which claim to be able to make both great American and Belgian waffles. The old cliché “Jack of all trades, master of none” almost always holds true when it comes to models which supposedly are versatile enough to produce terrific waffles whether you prefer them thin or thick. The optimal construction of a waffle maker is very different for each type, and there’s no way a quality machine can do justice to both.
Use your waffle maker for something other than, well, waffles. Brave bakers can try pressing grilled cheese, cinnamon rolls, hash browns and - yes- even pizza. If you’re a dessert lover, a waffle cone maker will bring the ice cream parlor to you. You can even create a Belgian waffle bowl with a specially designed waffle maker, and then fill it with anything you like. 

There are several variable heat controls to choose from. The grease run-off channels along the edge of this grill quickly and easily carry away excess oils. With its chrome exterior and stay-cool black synthetic handles, this appliance looks great on the counter, but you can easily wrap the cord and stand the unit upright for compact storage. It comes with a limited one year warranty.

Optional: If you want your waffles a little crispy you can add some extra oil to this batter too. Additionally, you can experiment with adding different flavoring extracts or spices to the mix to make them taste the way you like. Sometimes we add pumpkin spice mix for a seasonal flavor, other times we may add Pecans or Lily’s Dark Chocolate Chips for some variety too.
Monica and Andre's mother Vitoria is native to the region of Aveiro where this specialty waffle originates from.  After  her diagnosis with leukemia, they  promised her she would still see them bring this Portuguese waffle which is called the Bolacha Americana (American cookie) to America.  A few years after finishing college they finally decided they had to keep the promise they made to her and bring this treat to the US for the first time. They started in 2015 at local street fairs and brought their cousins,  sisters Amanda and Andrea along too. After the fairs that summer they all knew this was something they had to continue.  On October 10,2015  they opened the shop, down the block from the hospital they were all born in. Their diverse educational backgrounds, family bond and love for their product has made Costa Nova Waffle a new Long Island favorite for dessert and coffee. 
A waffle maker isn't just a kitchen appliance—it's a wish-granter. You know the fantasy. Sunday. You awaken to the sweet scent of butter and freshly brewed coffee wafting through your home. Tiptoe to the kitchen: there's your honey at the counter and a stack of perfectly golden waffles, still steaming from the iron. You pile on the maple syrup, dig in, and then go back for more. You stay in your pajamas all day and pretend you run your own diner.
Sadly, those are the only nice things we have to say about the new Oster. Despite being rated for the same wattage and designed in nearly the same way (even the maximum warm-up temperature was basically identical to the old model when we checked with a K-type thermometer probe) this model does not cook satisfactory belgian waffles. We even sent the first machine we got back for a replacement, certain that it must be broken.
Chef'sChoice PizzellePro Express Bake Griddle lets you bake Chef'sChoice PizzellePro Express Bake Griddle lets you bake 2 traditional size pizzelles in less than 30 seconds. An included cylinder form lets you roll the baked treats for cannoli shells. The non-stick baking surface and easy-clean overflow channel allow for effortless cleanup while a unique locking latch ensures uniform thickness ...  More + Product Details Close
Once the waffle iron has preheated, using a pastry brush, coat the inside (top and bottom) of the iron with oil. Pour enough batter into the waffle iron to just cover the waffle grid. Close the iron and cook the waffle as per the manufacturer’s instructions, about 3-5 minutes, until golden brown. To prevent the waffles from getting soggy, toss them— one at a time— back and forth between your hands a few times to help release any steam. Continue on with the rest of the batter until done.

The 4-square model allows you to feed a family in one fell swoop, but if you're single or cooking for two, it's also easy to downsize by filling just one or two of the batter reservoirs. We made several batches of waffles at different settings throughout the day using the same batter and each one was literally flawless: tall and airy, uniformly cooked on both sides, crisp and golden on the outside, moist and tender on the inside. And judging by the reactions of customers on Amazon who call this the "best waffle maker on the planet" and report that "the results are perfect every time," our outcomes were not a fluke. While we did not venture into the world of "will it waffle," we came across anecdotal reviews that reported using it to make "amazing" brownies and panini.
Though some have speculated that waffle irons first appeared in the 13th–14th centuries, it was not until the 15th century that a true physical distinction between the oublie and the waffle began to evolve.[8] Notably, while a recipe like the fourth in Le Ménagier de Paris was only flour, salt and wine – indistinguishable from common oublie recipes of the time – what did emerge was a new shape to many of the irons being produced. Not only were the newly fashioned ones rectangular, taking the form of the fer à hosties, but some circular oublie irons were cut down to create rectangles.[8] It was also in this period that the waffle's classic grid motif appeared clearly in a French fer à oublie and a Belgian wafelijzer – albeit in a more shallowly engraved fashion – setting the stage for the more deeply gridded irons that were about to become commonplace throughout Belgium.[19][20]
This is a great recipe and they taste great. I have read a lot of the negative posts so, as a culinary arts major and a Bachelors degree in food science, I did some experimenting. If you use a standard waffle iron, they do come out a little mushy and a lot of the batter is pushed out. Other than that, all was well. So, for all you haters out there, I would suggest you go out a purchase a true Belgium Waffle Iron and you will enjoy crispy and tasty waffles. If you choose not to buy the proper waffle iron....shut up and quit being hateful little snobs. I have a library of cookbooks and baking books and this recipe is in my top 2 favorite ones for waffles. I have enjoyed these every Super Bowl the last few years as this is a family tradition and many times for weekend breakfasts, with bacon of course, but I am sure you haters probably don’t like bacon either and will find something wrong with it as well.
Allow the waffle maker to cool completely before cleaning it. Wipe the plates down with a soft, damp cloth or paper towel. Brush any crumbs off with a soft kitchen brush. Use a rubber spatula to pick off any pieces of batter stuck to the plates. For really stubborn spots, cover them with cooking oil, wait 5 minutes, then wipe them away with a soft cloth.
Although we included one cast aluminum stovetop waffle maker, we decided to eliminate cast iron models, because seasoning the material added another layer of complexity to use and care. In addition, we were interested in testing a waffle maker with interchangeable plates (one that could also serve as a grill or panini press, for example), but the particular model we had our eye on, the T-fal EZ Clean Sandwich and Waffle Maker, has been discontinued, and in a later conversation with Matt Maichel, he confirmed that a device dedicated solely to waffle making works better than one that multitasks.
Enjoy fresh homemade waffles anytime with the Waffle Iron by Classic Cuisine! The flip style waffle maker features 180° rotation to ensure evenly cooked waffles every time, while the nonstick plates allow for easy release and the removable drip tray makes clean up a snap. The iron is equipped with an adjustable temperature dial and an indicator light that tells you when it is preheated, when it's time to flip your waffles, and when it's done. Depending on your type of batter, this maker can...
There are more than 3,250 user reviews on Amazon, and most are positive. "That sound you hear is the Angel choir when I finally sat down to golden crisp waffles. I had been craving them for months - not the thick Belgium ones, but the old-fashioned, round, thin crispy ones. Easy to use, makes delicious waffles. I used a setting between 3-4, and they came out perfect," wrote one verified buyer in March 2017.
Of course, waffles aren’t the only thing you can make in a waffle maker; there are dozens of creative uses for these handy kitchen gadgets that can make breakfast, lunch, or dinnertime more fun (and more delicious). Whether you’re purchasing your first-ever waffle maker or you’re looking to replace an older appliance, you’ve come to the right place. We’ve rounded up 25 top-rated waffle makers, based on features and functionality, durability, ease of use, and other buying considerations. Our picks are listed below in alphabetical order for easy reference. Ratings information is based on customer feedback from Amazon.com and is current at the time of this writing.
In 1971, Oregon track coach and Nike Co-founder Bill Bowerman used his wife's waffle iron to experiment with the idea of using waffle-ironed rubber to create a new sole for footwear that would grip but be lightweight; hence making easier for individual's to be able to increase their speed. Oregon's Hayward Field, where he worked, was transitioning to an artificial surface and "Bill wanted a sole without spikes that could grip equally well on grass or bark dust." He was talking to his wife about this puzzle over breakfast, when the waffle iron idea came into play. [9] Bowerman's design inspiration led to the introduction of the so-called "Moon Shoe" in 1972, so named because the waffle tread was said to resemble the footprints left by astronauts on the moon. Further refinement resulted in the "Waffle Trainer" in 1974, which helped fuel the explosive growth of Blue Ribbon Sports/Nike.[10][11]
One of my readers sent in the following photo of a Farber Broiler Robot in action. This is reader Frank cooking a steak in the Robot while generating power from a Kohler 1A2 portable power plant. This is the kind of gasoline generator that would have been used on farms prior to the Rural Electrification Administration. Frank brings his generator to various shows -- he has quite a nifty rig there!
American waffles[71] vary significantly. Generally denser and thinner than the Belgian waffle, they are often made from a batter leavened with baking powder, which is sometimes mixed with pecans, chocolate drops or berries and may be round, square, or rectangular in shape. Like American pancakes they are usually served as a sweet breakfast food, topped with butter and maple syrup, bacon, and other fruit syrups, honey, or powdered sugar. They are also found in many different savory dishes, such as fried chicken and waffles or topped with kidney stew.[72] They may also be served as desserts, topped with ice cream and various other toppings. A large chain (over 2,100 locations) of waffle specialty diners, Waffle House, is ubiquitous in the southern United States.
A waffle is a dish made from leavened batter or dough that is cooked between two plates that are patterned to give a characteristic size, shape, and surface impression. There are many variations based on the type of waffle iron and recipe used. Waffles are eaten throughout the world, particularly in Belgium, which has over a dozen regional varieties.[1] Waffles may be made fresh or simply heated after having been commercially precooked and frozen.
In regards to the materials used for manufacturing the waffle makers, these include cast steel, aluminum, cast iron, as well as non-stick coating. As for the size of the squares and pockets of the waffles, these vary depending on distinct units. In fact, some commercial waffle makers come with removable grids; which makes it easier to clean and sanitize the units.

2) I’m sure you get this all the time, but you’re how old!!!?? Your writing kiddo… “Somewhere between cacao percentages and the perfect crumb-to-apple ratio on a crumble was a nonchalantly scribbled list of ingredients for this gilt-edged Belgian waffles recipe.” LIKE WHAT! Sorry for the caps, but can you please tell me who taught you how to write so eloquently. I need to know. I’m 37 and can’t write like you!
This batter also benefited the most from the flip mechanism found in some of the irons we tested, likely due to the fact that it's a thinner batter that flows flat into the iron. (The flip design delivers even heating by making sure that a thin batter receives equal contact with the plates on both the top and the bottom.) The waffles resulting from this batter browned more evenly in the flip models than in the stationary ones, with the exception of our high-end picks, the Breville and All-Clad, both of which performed excellently. Ultimately, though, aside from our top-rated flip model, we’d steer you toward our other top picks, including the budget ones, even though they’re stationary: They produced better waffles overall due to higher heat and shorter cook time, despite their uneven browning.

Hamilton Beach's Belgian style waffle maker makes round waffles that can easily be split into eight individual waffle sticks, which kids and adults alike will love (we're already dreaming of setting up a waffle dip buffet table at brunch, plus the opportunity to carry waffles with us on the go). The product's deep grids — in addition to the deep overflow channel around their edge — make it near impossible for even the klutziest cook to spill. 
Space-saving small appliances, like a food processor or vertical waffle maker free up space on the counter while getting the cooking task at hand finished. The upright design of a vertical waffle iron means the batter gets poured into a spout, so the appliance cannot be over- or under-filled and the resulting waffles are even in thickness. Aluminum plates provide even heating, so waffles come out evenly browned with no flipping required. If you are cooking for picky eaters, five browning settings make it easy to create waffles that are perfectly browned based on personal preferences. An indicator light and alert sound tell you when the waffle maker is ready to use and when the pastry is ready to eat.
If you’re tight on space and money, the Black+Decker offers the most bang for your buck for thin, American-style waffles. It produces waffles that are thin and crunchy on the outside, with some chewiness on the inside; it makes four square waffles, with shallow wells, at a time; and its reversible plates and adjustable hinge convert it into a panini press for toasting thick sandwiches. The unit also opens up to lie completely flat as a griddle for eggs, pancakes, and more, making this a cheap all-in-one breakfast station. The plates are fully removable and dishwasher-safe for fast and easy cleanup.

Most modern waffle makers run on electricity and can be adjusted to produce lighter or darker waffles. Many, but not all, have indicator lights and audible beeps to cue you through the preheating, battering and cooking stages. Even more important, the waffle maker should maintain consistent, even heat to make sure your waffle isn't overcooked on the outside and mushy on the inside, or cooked in some places but not in others.
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