A related side-note: I recently made the waffles (live!) on Nom, a new video platform that allows you to live broadcast your cooking adventures. The platform was started by one of the founders of YouTube, so you know it’s good! I’ll be sharing more recipes and having more chats on our channel starting every Sunday, so be sure to subscribe to the channel get notified about scheduling. If you have any recipe or chat requests, please let me know in the comments below!
By the 16th century, paintings by Joachim de Beuckelaer, Pieter Aertsen and Pieter Bruegel clearly depict the modern waffle form.[21] Bruegel's work, in particular, not only shows waffles being cooked, but fine detail of individual waffles. In those instances, the waffle pattern can be counted as a large 12x7 grid, with cleanly squared sides, suggesting the use of a fairly thin batter, akin to our contemporary Brussels waffles (Brusselse wafels).[22]
Although the Krups Belgian Waffle Maker is our top pick, for the reasons laid out in the slides below, you should also consider the Oster CKSTWF2000 Belgian Waffle Maker in Stainless Steel, the All Clad 99011GT Stainless Steel Belgian Waffle Maker 2-Square, the Cuisinart WMR-CA Round Classic Waffle Maker, the Chef's Choice Pro Express Waffle Maker, and the Black & Decker G48TD 3-in-1 Waffle Maker.
Sunday brunch, or any-morning brunch, is better with warm, golden waffles. Crisp and light and scented with vanilla, waffles are the shape of a perfect breakfast, cupping pools of melted butter and maple for a lavish start to the day. Even though there's always a place in my heart for frozen Eggos, nothing beats the taste of homemade waffles, and making your own lets you skip the busy brunch rush. A great waffle iron and Stella’s recipes for buttermilk or yeasted waffles make homemade waffles a cinch.
Toppings are fabulous, but the perfectly crisp, tender, and golden brown square waffles from All-Clad's Belgian waffle maker will leave you wondering, who needs butter and syrup anyway? It was one of the top scorers in all our performance evaluations and tied for easiest to use overall. Turn the dial to your preferred doneness setting, pour in batter (it's okay if you use too much — the removable moat tray will catch any excess), and go about your business until it chimes.
“This sweet little baby waffle-maker is a dream. I swear, I squeal every time I pull out a perfectly made baby waffle because they are just so darn cute! Uncomplicated, easy to use and clean. Not a lot of bells and whistles here, but it does the job just right. They’re the perfect Eggo size, not huge like some waffle-makers, and get perfectly crisp. Sometimes, when I’m feeling crazy, I add in some blueberries or chocolate chips. If you’re making a lot, or want to do them quickly, I do suggest getting two, as you can only make one small(ish) waffle at a time with this.”

A Sunday morning spent in a sunny kitchen, surrounded by fairytale-like wisps of steam slowly fluttering from the Belgian waffle iron, is oddly reassuring— no matter what time of the year. You don’t need earsplitting machinery or a workout to mix up delectable waffles, which is one of the many reasons why you’ll adore this recipe. Everything practically comes together in a few stirs. That’s it. Oh, happy day!


Breakfast is better with this stainless steel Belgian-style waffle maker. The nonstick, extra-deep grids make thick, fluffy waffles with plenty of room for all your favorite toppings. Plus, the nonstick plates are easy to clean and they’re perfect for making a variety of foods—try out hash browns, grilled sandwiches, brownies, cinnamon rolls, and more! The versatile BLACK+DECKER™ Belgian Waffle Maker lets you create new treats and discover classic favorites.
Welcome to Costa Nova Waffle where you are transported from the east coast of the western world to the west coast of the eastern world, washing ashore on the beaches of Costa Nova, Aveiro (Portugal). It's a tiny fisherman's town boasting traditionally iconic striped houses, beautiful ornamental painted river boats called "moliceiros", the home city of the "Ovos Moles"  and some of the best waffles you've ever had as presented in an untraditional fashion in comparison to the world's standard of what a waffle should be. These decadently delicious treats return us to our childhood summers spent on the beaches of Aveiro. The magnificent coastal waffles are thin flat waffles, essentially offspring of a marriage between the typically recognized waffle and a crepe however, presented in a most portable manner. They are served crispy (Bolacha) or soft (Tripa), with a myriad of available fillings, and are perfectly paired with the compelling flavors and aromas of the finest Portuguese espresso, cappuccino and “Galão” latte also available at Costa Nova Waffle

What we liked: The Cuisinart waffle maker was the hottest of all the irons we tested, making waffles in just over three minutes. The waffles it produced were light and fluffy on the inside, with a delicate and crisp crust. They had deep divots for holding lots of syrup and butter, and a traditional round shape. Because the iron gets so hot, the adjustable temperature is actually a useful feature, unlike on most of the other waffle irons we tested.


"... Hi there! I ran across your website today while doing a Google search for antique waffle makers. I bought one and am thinking of spiffing it up and using it, but I can't find ANY information on it anywhere! I was wondering if you'd heard of it. It's called the Self-Timer Waffle Iron and is made by the Self-Timer Waffle Iron Company of Chicago, Illinois (pretty creative name, huh?). I'm attaching some pictures. Any help you could give me in identifying this machine would be great. .."
Our second budget pick, the Hamilton Beach Belgian Style Waffle Maker (26009), is another compact, good-for-small-apartments machine that makes consistently excellent waffles. It produces waffles more like those of our winner: thick, Belgian-style, with a crisp crust and a tender interior. Like the Cuisinart WMR-CA, however, this Hamilton Beach model tends to cost less than $30 but also feels somewhat cheaply made.
This waffle maker will make 4 waffles at once, which will get you to the kitchen table faster – and that’s always appreciated. The settings on this waffle maker are so simple that there’s no training necessary; you just slide the control to select how brown you’d like your waffles, and it will let you know when the they’re done with a green indicator light. It’s just like a toaster.
Earliest of the 16th century waffle recipes, Om ghode waffellen te backen – from the Dutch KANTL 15 manuscript (ca. 1500–1560) – is only the second known waffle recipe after the four variants described in Le Ménagier de Paris.[23] For the first time, partial measurements were given, sugar was used, and spices were added directly to the batter: Take grated white bread. Take with that the yolk of an egg and a spoonful of pot sugar or powdered sugar. Take with that half water and half wine, and ginger and cinnamon.[24]
The 18th century is also when the word "waffle" first appeared in the English language, in a 1725 printing of Court Cookery by Robert Smith.[39] Recipes had begun to spread throughout England and America, though essentially all were patterned after established Dutch, Belgian, German, and French versions.[40] Waffle parties, known as 'wafel frolics', were documented as early as 1744 in New Jersey, and the Dutch had earlier established waffles in New Amsterdam (New York City).[41][42]
By the early 20th century, waffle recipes became rare in recipe books, and only 29 professional waffle craftsmen, the oublieurs, remained in Paris.[52][55] Waffles were shifting from a predominately street-vendor-based product to an increasingly homemade product, aided by the 1918 introduction of GE's first electric commercial waffle maker.[56] By the mid-1930s, dry pancake/waffle mix had been marketed by a number of companies, including Aunt Jemima, Bisquick, and a team of three brothers from San Jose, Calif. – the Dorsas. It is the Dorsas who would go on to innovate commercial production of frozen waffles, which they began selling under the name "Eggo" in 1953.[57] Manufacturers are now testing the production of waffles with potato starch, which increase the stability of the waffle and protect them from sticking to the iron.[58]
One feature of the Classic Round Waffle Maker which we loved was the browning dial with seven settings, allowing you to choose the exact crispness you prefer. Another was a “ready-to-eat” alert – when waffles are ready, the machine beeps to let you know. That’s a lot better than interfering with the cooking process by continually opening the lid to check on progress.
The closest thing to an old-fashioned non-electric waffle iron is the pizelle maker. Pizzelle (pronounced "pit-sell") are Italian wafer cookies. The name comes from the Italian pizze for round and flat. Many different cultures have adapted this technology and re-named it accordingly. In Scandinavia they are also known as "Lukken" and in Holland as Krumcake. All use an iron similar iron to the pizzelle.
Take waffles beyond breakfast with the Cuisinart 4 Slice Belgian Waffle Maker. This reliable, high performance waffle iron has an elegant stainless steel top. It makes deep-pocket waffles that hold more toppings for more delicious options! 5 Setting controls create customized results to meet all tastes. Green light signals when unit is ready to bake and when baking is done, eliminating cooking guesswork!

Sunday brunch, or any-morning brunch, is better with warm, golden waffles. Crisp and light and scented with vanilla, waffles are the shape of a perfect breakfast, cupping pools of melted butter and maple for a lavish start to the day. Even though there's always a place in my heart for frozen Eggos, nothing beats the taste of homemade waffles, and making your own lets you skip the busy brunch rush. A great waffle iron and Stella’s recipes for buttermilk or yeasted waffles make homemade waffles a cinch.


"This is one of the best waffle makers I have found. It has removable trays for easy cleaning …. I have used it to cook waffles, sandwiches, and hamburgers. All have been cooked evenly and fully. The hamburgers were done in about 6-7 minutes and sandwiches in about 3-4 minutes. This cuts down on time since each side would have to be cooked in a skillet or open griddle," wrote one verified purchaser in February 2017. Negative reviewers complain that the unit is not very sturdy and the top plate frequently falls down.

The Wonderffle Stuffed Waffle Iron is a patent-pending stovetop waffle maker that let's you cook Belgian-style waffles with your favorite foods inside of them. It has a unique form and function that allows you to remove the cooked waffle without ever having to touch the waffle itself. Since the "toppings" can be fully-enclosed inside the waffle, you can take your favorite meals with you on the go with no mess. So, do you like chicken and waffles? Now you can enjoy a chicken stuffed waffle!
There are more than 170 user reviews on Amazon, and most are highly positive. "This is what I have been looking for," wrote one verified purchaser in October 2016. "I make waffles weekly and even take my waffle maker on family vacations to the beach. I need a new one every few years and hesitated spending so much for this one. I am glad I did. The waffles are thick and fluffy inside."
Of course, it's a waffle iron that makes it all possible. And while the same machine may spend the other 51 Sundays a year wedged in the back of your cabinet, when that craving strikes, it better be ready for the big leagues. Because if you're going to go through the motions—the ceremony!—of making homemade waffles, why bother with mediocre results? If that's what you wanted, you could just defrost some frozen ones.
One of my readers sent in the following photo of a Farber Broiler Robot in action. This is reader Frank cooking a steak in the Robot while generating power from a Kohler 1A2 portable power plant. This is the kind of gasoline generator that would have been used on farms prior to the Rural Electrification Administration. Frank brings his generator to various shows -- he has quite a nifty rig there!
Cook delicious waffles with the Chef'sChoice WafflePro Five Cook delicious waffles with the Chef'sChoice WafflePro Five of Hearts Electric Waffle Maker. This waffle maker incorporates a Quad baking system that makes it easy to select the ideal flavor texture and color and features a Stainless steel lid with a floating hinge to help ensure uniform thickness and baking. ...  More + Product Details Close
No, this waffle maker cannot compete with the All-Clad, but at about a quarter of the price, the Krups sure gives it a respectable run for its money. The build isn't as solid—there's some plastic, no 18/10 stainless here—but like the All-Clad, it is generously proportioned to yield four tall, deeply grooved Belgian-style waffles per batch and, with an adjustable dial for cook control and an audible chime that signals doneness, it doesn't skimp on extra features. It does best the All-Clad in one regard: its non-stick plates not only release cooked waffles easily, they pop out for easy cleaning and are dishwasher safe. That's a game changer right there.
There are several variable heat controls to choose from. The grease run-off channels along the edge of this grill quickly and easily carry away excess oils. With its chrome exterior and stay-cool black synthetic handles, this appliance looks great on the counter, but you can easily wrap the cord and stand the unit upright for compact storage. It comes with a limited one year warranty.
The 18th century is also when the word "waffle" first appeared in the English language, in a 1725 printing of Court Cookery by Robert Smith.[39] Recipes had begun to spread throughout England and America, though essentially all were patterned after established Dutch, Belgian, German, and French versions.[40] Waffle parties, known as 'wafel frolics', were documented as early as 1744 in New Jersey, and the Dutch had earlier established waffles in New Amsterdam (New York City).[41][42]

Optional: If you want your waffles a little crispy you can add some extra oil to this batter too. Additionally, you can experiment with adding different flavoring extracts or spices to the mix to make them taste the way you like. Sometimes we add pumpkin spice mix for a seasonal flavor, other times we may add Pecans or Lily’s Dark Chocolate Chips for some variety too.
We’ve covered plenty of brunch-worthy appliances and tchotchkes in the past, including a waffle iron for Instagram-worthy waffles, eggcups à la Call Me by Your Name, the best French presses and pour-overs, and even skillets to make the perfect Chez Panisse–style eggs. Here, we’re doing a deep dive into the best waffle-makers available on Amazon. (Note that reviews have been edited for length and clarity.)  

The removable waffle grids are dishwasher safe. To clean the drip tray, rinse off excess overflowed batter with hot water. For easy cleanup and storage, wipe down the exterior with a damp, soapy cloth and fold the handle. Do not use steel wool, scouring pads, abrasive cleansers or sharp or pointed objects on any part, as this will tarnish the steel exterior.

Recipes for both Waffles and Fried Chicken appear in What Mrs. Fisher Knows About Old Southern Cooking, (Abby Fisher, 1881). Mrs. Fisher was a former slave and her book is generally considered the first cookbook written by an African-American. Apparently, white people were eating waffles and fried chicken as well as recipes for the two appear in Mrs. Porter's Southern Cookery Book published in 1871.
Butter is another thing to keep in mind when it comes to fat. Don’t use it; well, don’t use it as it is for making the waffles. As much as I love butter, it doesn’t create a crisp enough waffle in its truest form. There are options, however. A somewhat obvious option is, of course, any neutral-tasting oil. The other option, which might seem unusual, is clarified butter. If you have the time to make clarified butter feel free to use it here. But, as I’ll probably write many times, please don’t feel obliged to do so— oil works marvelously in this recipe. If you’re worried about imparting flavor, coconut oil is a fantastic option.
If our main pick sells out, we also like the Chef’sChoice WafflePro Classic Belgian (840B), our original top pick, which performs just as well as the Krups—but only with thick batter, which makes it less flexible in practice. It also produces fewer waffles at a time than the Krups, but it does have a wide range of doneness settings, and it will beep when your waffles are ready. 

Unfortunately, we were disappointed by the performance of the Waring Pro. Despite being the most expensive waffle maker among our finalists, it produced waffles slower than every other waffle maker. In our benchmark two waffle cooking test, the Waring Pro took 16 minutes and 30 seconds — nearly nine minutes longer than the BELLA waffle maker, and almost two minutes slower than the second slowest waffle maker, the Hamilton Beach.

There are two other key subjects to consider, both related to the cooking process. First, you shouldn’t have to wrestle with your waffles (or have to pry them out with a sharp knife) when they’re ready to come out of the machine. That doesn’t mean a waffle maker must have non-stick surfaces, but we’ve found that non-stick coatings usually make all the difference. A good alternative can be a cast-iron waffle maker, but continually seasoning a cast-iron appliance calls for another level of care and work.
“Leslie Knope is my spirit animal, as I am completely obsessed with waffles, and I am a little bit crazy just like her. She would love this waffle iron, but then she would probably trash it after one use because she would be scared of putting JJ’s Diner out of business. Thankfully, I don’t have a JJ’s Diner near me, and I like to make my own waffles. I can see Jerry/Larry/Garry Gengurch buying this waffle iron for Leslie Knope, and the mockery that would follow the next day as Leslie and the entire office would blame Jerry/Larry/Garry for putting JJ’s Diner in danger.
A related side-note: I recently made the waffles (live!) on Nom, a new video platform that allows you to live broadcast your cooking adventures. The platform was started by one of the founders of YouTube, so you know it’s good! I’ll be sharing more recipes and having more chats on our channel starting every Sunday, so be sure to subscribe to the channel get notified about scheduling. If you have any recipe or chat requests, please let me know in the comments below!
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