The green “ready” light didn’t always turn off immediately after we filled the Krups with batter and closed the lid, which was confusing—a glance at the machine might make you think the waffle is done. But the light always did turn off in time, and it consistently turned on again with a resonating beep when the waffle was ready. By being patient and waiting for the beep, we were never led astray, and waffles always came out cooked to the right doneness.
If you can’t find the Krups GQ502D, we recommend turning to the Chef’sChoice WafflePro Classic Belgian (840B), which makes a Belgian-style round waffle that’s somewhat thinner than the results from our top pick. This model was the top pick in our original guide, for good reason: It bakes waffles evenly to a wide range of doneness levels (with some exceptions; see below), plus it has an alarm to alert you when the plates are sufficiently heated and the waffle is ready. However, it also has a couple of minor drawbacks, and those dropped it to the number-two slot.

Our best waffle maker top 5 list looks at the performance of all of the machines on the market, rather than limiting our selections to just one category. That way, you should be able to find the exact waffle maker you’re looking for while knowing it’s one of the best available. Of course, while you are preparing your waffles you will want to serve them with a healthy fruit smoothie prepared in your top of the range blender…


The Krups has a relatively small footprint for a machine that can produce four waffles at a time. It takes up just about a foot of counter space, and at just 4½ inches tall, it’s much easier to store than a bulky flip-style machine. A spool on the underside allows you to wrap up and secure the power cord easily, and because the lid locks in place, you can store this machine either upright or flat. Plus, the construction of this machine is nice and sturdy, as the hinge doesn’t wobble, and the dial turns smoothly and feels reliable. Krups also covers the GQ502D with a two-year limited warranty.
Overall, the Krups was as easy to use as any machine we tested—though no machine is particularly tricky to figure out, as long as you read the instructions. Still, the GQ502D’s intuitive, set-it-and-forget-it system made the process particularly simple. Like all waffle makers, it does get hot in places: The steam vent at the back heated up quickly for us, and the top of the machine was too hot to touch after a couple of rounds of waffles. But the heatproof handle stayed cool, even after multiple uses, something that couldn’t be said of competitors like the Black+Decker Removable Plate Waffle Maker (WM700R), where built-up steam around the handle made the machine uncomfortable and risky to use.
Pandan waffles originate from Vietnam and are characterized by the use of pandan flavoring and coconut milk in the batter.[79] The pandan flavoring results in the batter's distinctive spring green color.[80] When cooked, the waffle browns and crisps on the outside and stays green and chewy on the inside. Unlike most waffles, pandan waffles are typically eaten plain. In Vietnam they are relatively cheap and so are popular among children.[81] They are a popular street food made in either cast iron molds heated with charcoal or in electric waffle irons.[82]
Wells was known for jazz, waffles, and celebrities throughout the 30s, 40s and 50s. One story about Well's seems to be widely told and re-told. During late 1950s, Sammy Davis, Jr. and Kim Novak were dating. One morning after breakfast at Wells' Kim's fur coat was found to be "missing" from the coat-room. Frank Sinatra made a stern announcement to the crowd about the missing coat and it appeared back the next day.
If boring waffles aren’t your thing, then this may be just the added excitement your breakfast needs. We think a breakfast with these Mickey Waffles would also be a great way to surprise your children to announce a planned trip to Disney World! And even if that’s not in the plan, these waffles will still bring a smile to the face of all Mickey lovers.
This waffle iron will make your Valentine’s Day morning all the more special – or any day you want to celebrate love – because it will make you one waffle that will separate into 5 smaller waffles, each shaped like hearts. It beeps to notify you when it’s preheated and ready to cook, and another beep lets you know when the waffle is done. And its Teflon surface makes for a smooth clean up, too.
A related side-note: I recently made the waffles (live!) on Nom, a new video platform that allows you to live broadcast your cooking adventures. The platform was started by one of the founders of YouTube, so you know it’s good! I’ll be sharing more recipes and having more chats on our channel starting every Sunday, so be sure to subscribe to the channel get notified about scheduling. If you have any recipe or chat requests, please let me know in the comments below!
Flip or stationary? Once you’ve chosen between Belgian or American-style waffles, the next step is to determine if you want the assistance of a flip mechanism. Without flipping over the irons, you’re relying on the rising agent in your batter (or just over-filling your waffle maker) to quickly and evenly fill the top plate. The flip mechanism ensures even distribution for more consistent waffles. They take up more space vertically, but in the storage position they’re actually pretty manageable.

Brussels waffles[61] are prepared with an egg-white-leavened or yeast-leavened batter, traditionally an ale yeast;[62] occasionally both types of leavening are used together. They are lighter, crisper and have larger pockets compared to other European waffle varieties, and are easy to differentiate from Liège Waffles by their rectangular sides. In Belgium, most waffles are served warm by street vendors and dusted with confectioner's sugar, though in tourist areas they might be topped with whipped cream, soft fruit or chocolate spread. Variants of the Brussels waffles – with whipped and folded egg whites cooked in large rectangular forms – date from the 18th century.[63] However, the oldest recognized reference to "Gaufres de Bruxelles" (Brussels Waffles) by name is attributed from 1842/43 to Florian Dacher, a Swiss baker in Ghent, Belgium, who had previously worked under pastry chefs in central Brussels.[64] Philippe Cauderlier would later publish Dacher's recipe in the 1874 edition of his recipe book "La Pâtisserie et la Confiture". Maximilien Consael, another Ghent chef, had claimed to have invented the waffles in 1839, though there's no written record of him either naming or selling the waffles until his participation in the 1856 Brussels Fair.[65][66] Neither man created the recipe; they simply popularized and formalized an existing recipe as the Brussels waffle.[67]
Here are four ads for the Twin-O-Matic. Manning-Bowman always portrayed its products as being used in very fashionable surroundings. If you can't read the third ad, in the Quin cartoon, one Dowager says to the other: "Looks like our cook has been handling these. Thank Goodness I've got an unbreakable percolator." Manning-Bowman products were targeted at the ladies who had time to go to art museums, leaving the dirty work to servants. 

This waffle maker will make 4 waffles at once, which will get you to the kitchen table faster – and that’s always appreciated. The settings on this waffle maker are so simple that there’s no training necessary; you just slide the control to select how brown you’d like your waffles, and it will let you know when the they’re done with a green indicator light. It’s just like a toaster.
The Breville quickly produces crispy brown waffles, with the most consistent color of all the batches we tested, making it the best option if you prefer the thinner type of American waffle. The waffles managed to be perfectly crispy, without becoming dry, and maintained some fluffiness within. Although it makes only one waffle at a time, it reheats and cooks rapidly, so you can crank out waffle after waffle with ease. The built-in drip tray, nonstick surface, and minimal design keep cleanup effortless.
"... No appetites are safe from the magnificent Southern Creole cuisine when visiting Wells restaurant, located uptown in the Big Apple. Famous for more than their chicken and waffles, Wells entertains customers with Caribbean flair and a frenzy of live music. Harlem hasn't been the same since Wells opened in May 1938. The owner, Elizabeth Wells, is determined to bring people a humble, homey atmosphere with exciting home-style cooking, but with a twist of island flavor and a lot of fun. Joseph T. Wells, the late husband of Wells, had a record of cooking techniques in the mix. Working as a waiter and manager of a restaurant in Florida, Joseph took his craft to New York during the late 1920s. It was inevitable for the young entrepreneur to start his business and, by the spring of 1938, the restaurant bearing his name opened its doors. Elizabeth Wells entered the picture later. They married in 1966, even though she had joined the establishment in 1963. The married couple produced a son named Tommy Wells. With an avalanche of victory for the restaurant, Wells bloomed as one of the greatest hot spots in Harlem, with a bevy of entertainers who dropped in...Wells has been spinning the wheels of the restaurant with tip-top soul food and no regrets..."

There are two other key subjects to consider, both related to the cooking process. First, you shouldn’t have to wrestle with your waffles (or have to pry them out with a sharp knife) when they’re ready to come out of the machine. That doesn’t mean a waffle maker must have non-stick surfaces, but we’ve found that non-stick coatings usually make all the difference. A good alternative can be a cast-iron waffle maker, but continually seasoning a cast-iron appliance calls for another level of care and work. 

We were looking for an iron that consistently produced tall, evenly browned waffles with crisp shells and moist crumbs without any trial and error on our part. We focused on the newer, more prevalent flip- and rotary-style models, which either turn on a hinge or spin 180 degrees on a stand, but we also included several conventional stationary models. We set a price cap of $100 and tested 13 irons, making batches of both Belgian-style yeasted waffles and our everyday Cook’s Illustrated Best Buttermilk Waffles in each machine.
If boring waffles aren’t your thing, then this may be just the added excitement your breakfast needs. We think a breakfast with these Mickey Waffles would also be a great way to surprise your children to announce a planned trip to Disney World! And even if that’s not in the plan, these waffles will still bring a smile to the face of all Mickey lovers.
Start your day like a superhero with a plate full of golden brown waffles emblazoned with avengers icons. The vibrant graphic features Hulk, Iron Man, Captain America and Thor. Each waffle is a 4.25" square imprinted with a different icon including Hulk's fist, Iron Man's helmet, Captain America's shield and Thor's hammer. Vibrant graphic featuring Hulk, Iron Man, Captain America and Thor. Bakes 4 different waffles imprinted with superhero icons. Adjustable browning control. Nonstick baking...

Monica and Andre's mother Vitoria is native to the region of Aveiro where this specialty waffle originates from.  After  her diagnosis with leukemia, they  promised her she would still see them bring this Portuguese waffle which is called the Bolacha Americana (American cookie) to America.  A few years after finishing college they finally decided they had to keep the promise they made to her and bring this treat to the US for the first time. They started in 2015 at local street fairs and brought their cousins,  sisters Amanda and Andrea along too. After the fairs that summer they all knew this was something they had to continue.  On October 10,2015  they opened the shop, down the block from the hospital they were all born in. Their diverse educational backgrounds, family bond and love for their product has made Costa Nova Waffle a new Long Island favorite for dessert and coffee. 
When it comes to making American-style waffles there's no question: the Cuisinart Round Classic Waffle Maker (Est. $30) is the winner by a landslide, drawing hundreds of enthusiastic user reviews and kudos from experts like Your Best Digs, Wirecutter and Good Housekeeping. The Cuisinart waffle iron turns out one waffle at a time, with five doneness settings to choose from and indicator lights that tell you when it's ready for batter and when the waffle is done.

The Bella Copper Titanium Rotating Belgian Waffle Maker has a unique ceramic non-stick coating that is eight times more durable and cooks up to 30% faster than standard non-stick coatings. The coating is reinforced with titanium for outstanding durability and resistance to metal utensils. This healthy-eco coating does not contain lead, cadmium and is PTFE and PFOA free. No matter what side of the bed you wake up on, you will make the perfect flip with the Bella rotating waffle maker. Its...


However, we found the absolute best value to come from the BELLA – 13591 Classic Rotating Belgian Waffle Maker. With just a slightly larger footprint than the Cuisinart, this will give you the tastiest, most consistent, and most evenly cooked waffles. Best of all, the BELLA is even quicker than our old top pick, so you can grab a cup of coffee and start enjoying those delicious waffles as quickly as possible.
Belgian waffles are a family favorite when it comes to Sunday brunch or a fun weeknight treat. There are special waffle irons that are specifically made to produce the iconic fluffy and decadent Belgian waffles that everyone has come to love. These waffles are generally taller and fluffier than American-style waffles, which are short and dense. Traditional waffle makers in the United States make American-style waffles, so you’ll need a special waffle iron in order to make true Belgian waffles. If you want to spice up your offerings, then you can also find Belgian waffles with fun shapes and designs, from hearts to flowers. If you don’t have the time to create a Belgian waffler recipe from scratch, then a Belgian waffle iron is versatile enough to work with boxed waffle mix. When looking for a new Belgian waffle iron, make sure to check out the premium features and get a size, shape, and design that will make it easy to serve your friends, family, and guests without having to labor over preparation and cleanup.
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Pandan waffles originate from Vietnam and are characterized by the use of pandan flavoring and coconut milk in the batter.[79] The pandan flavoring results in the batter's distinctive spring green color.[80] When cooked, the waffle browns and crisps on the outside and stays green and chewy on the inside. Unlike most waffles, pandan waffles are typically eaten plain. In Vietnam they are relatively cheap and so are popular among children.[81] They are a popular street food made in either cast iron molds heated with charcoal or in electric waffle irons.[82]
For our original testing, we assembled a panel of seven tasters. We made at least two rounds of Bisquick waffles and one round of yeast-raised waffles in each model. Rather than judge the time it took for the machines to heat up and cook, we focused on how good a waffle each maker produced. At first we followed the indicators to determine when the waffles were done, and if a machine had no indicator, we waited for it to stop steaming, as Matt Maichel suggested. We allowed for flexibility in cooking time, so if one needed more time, we would shut the lid and let it cook a little longer.
If you're willing to pay for a classic waffle maker that doesn't require much fiddling, also consider the All-Clad 99012GT Classic Round Waffle Maker (Est. $130), which draws praise from Good Housekeeping, Top Ten Reviews and Groom and Style for making one perfect waffle after another. "No fancy features here -- just perfectly crisp, buttery waffles, batch after batch,"  writes Betty Gold for Good Housekeeping.
What we didn’t like: This is a big and bulky unit, making it a difficult fit in small spaces. Without a drip tray, there is potential for mess. (However, because it's a flip model, you need less batter to fill up the iron, so drips are also less likely.) There was some unevenness in cooking, with the edges browning a touch faster than the rest. The deep wells and fixed plates make cleanup difficult.
This model is also equipped with an on/off switch, which people with large kitchens may find useful, as it makes it easier to keep it set up on a counter without having to unplug after each use (especially helpful if your outlets are in inconvenient places, and repeatedly plugging and unplugging is a hassle). It makes two seven-inch waffles at a time, with a two-minute recovery time, allowing you to make waffles for a crowd. The flip function means it evenly cooks thicker and thinner batters alike and requires less batter to fill edge to edge.
CucinaPro Bubble Waffler creates a large hexagon shaped CucinaPro Bubble Waffler creates a large hexagon shaped waffle which has a unique bubbled texture. These delicious waffles sometimes called egg waffles or eggettes have crispy golden outsides and light tender interiors. They are best served hot and often eaten plain. They can also be served with fruit and flavors ...  More + Product Details Close
This is a great recipe and they taste great. I have read a lot of the negative posts so, as a culinary arts major and a Bachelors degree in food science, I did some experimenting. If you use a standard waffle iron, they do come out a little mushy and a lot of the batter is pushed out. Other than that, all was well. So, for all you haters out there, I would suggest you go out a purchase a true Belgium Waffle Iron and you will enjoy crispy and tasty waffles. If you choose not to buy the proper waffle iron....shut up and quit being hateful little snobs. I have a library of cookbooks and baking books and this recipe is in my top 2 favorite ones for waffles. I have enjoyed these every Super Bowl the last few years as this is a family tradition and many times for weekend breakfasts, with bacon of course, but I am sure you haters probably don’t like bacon either and will find something wrong with it as well.
A dial on the Krups GQ502D controls browning, on a scale of 1 (lightest) to 5 (darkest). You can easily control how cooked your waffles are without ever producing an inedible one: The lightest waffles are barely brown but still cooked through, while the darkest are crisp and brown but never burnt. Compare that with the Chef’sChoice 830B, which in our tests got so hot that it started to burn waffles on a medium setting, or even with our runner-up, the Chef’sChoice 840B, which can burn its thinner waffles on the highest setting. The dial on the Krups machine also allows you to turn the waffle maker off without unplugging it, a feature that very few waffle makers have. Such a feature isn’t totally necessary, but it is nice to have if you want to keep the machine on your counter ready to use; it’s also one that a lot of Amazon customers seem to desire, judging from reviews of other waffle makers across the board.
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The Cuisinart Round Classic Waffle Maker also has a non-stick coating (although you'll want to apply a little cooking oil beforehand for best results), and it's small enough to take up very little space, especially when stored on its edge. Watch your fingers, though: testers for Wirecutter and Your Best Digs warn that steam sometimes vents onto the handle when you open the lid, making it hot to the touch. Users who encounter this issue solve it by putting something heavy on top of the waffle maker's lid to keep it shut as the waffle cooks, which in turn stops the steam from escaping; or you could just wear an oven mitt when you open it.
Liège waffles, the most popular contemporary Belgian waffle variety, are rumored to have been invented during the 18th century, as well, by the chef to the prince-bishop of Liège.[43][44] However, there are no German, French, Dutch, or Belgian cookbooks that contain references to them in this period – by any name – nor are there any waffle recipes that mention the Liège waffle's distinctive ingredients, brioche-based dough and pearl sugar.[45] It is not until 1814 that Antoine Beauvilliers publishes a recipe in l'Art du Cuisiner where brioche dough is introduced as the base of the waffle and sucre cassé (crushed block sugar) is used as a garnish for the waffles, though not worked into the dough.[46] Antonin Carême, the famous Parisian pastry chef, is the first to incorporate gros sucre into several waffle variations named in his 1822 work, Le Maitre d'Hotel Français.[47] Then, in 1834, Leblanc publishes a complete recipe for gaufres grêlées (hail waffles), where gros sucre is mixed in.[48] A full Gaufre de Liège recipe does not appear until 1921.[49]

Waffles remained widely popular in Europe for the first half of the 19th century, despite the 1806 British Atlantic naval blockade that greatly inflated the price of sugar.[50] This coincided with the commercial production of beet sugar in continental Europe, which, in a matter of decades, had brought the price down to historical lows.[51] Within the transitional period from cane to beet sugar, Florian Dacher formalized a recipe for the Brussels Waffle, the predecessor to American "Belgian" waffles, recording the recipe in 1842/43.[52][53][54] Stroopwafels (Dutch syrup wafels), too, rose to prominence in the Netherlands by the middle of the century.[52] However, by the second half of the 1800s, inexpensive beet sugar became widely available, and a wide range of pastries, candies and chocolates were now accessible to the middle class, as never before; waffles' popularity declined rapidly.[50][51]
Monica and Andre's mother Vitoria is native to the region of Aveiro where this specialty waffle originates from.  After  her diagnosis with leukemia, they  promised her she would still see them bring this Portuguese waffle which is called the Bolacha Americana (American cookie) to America.  A few years after finishing college they finally decided they had to keep the promise they made to her and bring this treat to the US for the first time. They started in 2015 at local street fairs and brought their cousins,  sisters Amanda and Andrea along too. After the fairs that summer they all knew this was something they had to continue.  On October 10,2015  they opened the shop, down the block from the hospital they were all born in. Their diverse educational backgrounds, family bond and love for their product has made Costa Nova Waffle a new Long Island favorite for dessert and coffee. 
Recipes for both Waffles and Fried Chicken appear in What Mrs. Fisher Knows About Old Southern Cooking, (Abby Fisher, 1881). Mrs. Fisher was a former slave and her book is generally considered the first cookbook written by an African-American. Apparently, white people were eating waffles and fried chicken as well as recipes for the two appear in Mrs. Porter's Southern Cookery Book published in 1871.
Here are four ads for the Twin-O-Matic. Manning-Bowman always portrayed its products as being used in very fashionable surroundings. If you can't read the third ad, in the Quin cartoon, one Dowager says to the other: "Looks like our cook has been handling these. Thank Goodness I've got an unbreakable percolator." Manning-Bowman products were targeted at the ladies who had time to go to art museums, leaving the dirty work to servants.
Unless you lead a life of leisure (or run a bed and breakfast) chances are your waffle iron is not going to be a daily-use appliance, so ideally you shouldn't have to allocate much of your kitchen real estate to store it. Since most waffle irons are pretty bulky, we paid special attention to the design—does the size of the machine make sense? Is the space well-used? Does it feel solidly built? Does seem like it will hold up well to cleaning and other wear and tear?
That non-stick coating and oil combo not only results in pretty waffles on your plate, it also means cleanup is a snap because you won't have to scrub bits of stuck waffle out of the grids. Some electric waffle makers have removable plates that can be tossed in the sink or dishwasher. If you're dealing with an electric waffle maker that doesn't have removable grids, you can't dunk the whole thing for a good cleaning -- so a soft-bristle toothbrush or damp rag are your best cleaning options.
The Kalorik Traditional Belgian Waffle Maker makes large, fluffy, Belgian-style waffles with ease. Pour your favorite waffle batter onto the non-stick coated plates and close the lid, the waffle maker does the rest! Equipped with an adjustable temperature control knob, you can cook your waffles to perfection, make them as soft or as crispy as you would like. The unit features power and ready indicator lights, so that you always know when your waffle maker has reached its optimum cooking...
First off, the build: this thing is a tank. Made of the same 18/10 stainless as All-Clad's prized cookware, the 4-square model we tested weighs in at about 14 pounds, so lifting it will give you a nice little bicep workout to offset all that maple syrup. (A smaller, slightly less expensive 2-square model is also available; it weighs closer to 10 pounds.) That said, the exterior dimensions are not considerably larger than other 4-square models on our list (in fact, it was smaller than some)—so, though heavy, the All-Clad doesn't seem like it would take up appreciably more storage space. Ultimately, because its heft seems like a result of quality and sturdiness, we decided that the extra weight was an issue we would be happy to live with.

We considered looking at dual-purpose waffle makers with interchangeable plates such as the T-fal EZ Clean Sandwich and Waffle Maker (SW6100) but ultimately passed. Appliances that try to excel at two disparate tasks often fail at one, and from reading the reviews, it seems clear that this T-fal model—which is now discontinued—might make great sandwiches but fails to make excellent waffles.


With a little flick of the wrist, The Hamilton Beach® Flip Belgian Waffle Maker lets you effortlessly bake, make and flip perfect waffles just like a gourmet restaurant chef. Best of all, the adjustable browning control makes waffles golden brown and crispy on the outside and meltingly tender on the inside. To cook waffles like the best restaurants do, simply preheat the waffle maker until the READY light comes on. Then, pour in waffle batter and flip to lock in place. Waffles are done in 5-8 minutes, depending on the setting and the recipe. Using an oven mitt, flip the waffle maker back and open the cover to a perfect waffle.
The Cuisinart Vertical Waffle Maker (WAF-V100) seems clever at first: It stands upright, and you pour batter into a spout at the top. But Amazon customers complain that the spout clogs easily, and that it’s too small to allow add-ins such as blueberries or chocolate chips. Plus, this model won’t work at all if you want to waffle anything else, like grilled cheese or hash browns.
Hungry diners know whether or not their breakfast is ready when the Cuisinart's convenient "ready to bake/ready to eat" indicator lights with corresponding red and green hues come on. The Cuisinart features a cool-touch lid and round, non-stick cooking plates with four quarters, giving users the option of having a single waffle or dividing it up. We particularly like how this waffle maker, in its brushed stainless steel housing, stands on end for convenient storage in tight spaces.
Breakfast isn’t called the most important meal of the day without good cause. Jumpstarting your day with a nutritious breakfast has shown to improve mental performance, give you energy and healthy carbohydrates, and help reduce mindless snacking.  What’s more, where breakfast is prepared and bought has changed over the years.  Instead of traditional breakfast meals and times anymore, consumers are now having breakfast at all times of the day, reinterpreting breakfast foods in creative ways and cooking at home.
You can depend on the Breville the No Mess Waffle for thin crispy waffle rounds, one after another, after another. The other great thing about this brushed stainless-steel waffler is that it has a moat around the waffle grid that catches any excess batter so there’s never any runover on the counter or the machine itself making it truly no mess. It lights up and beeps when it’s hot enough for baking and again when your waffle is ready, but we wish the beeps were louder—they would be easy to miss in a noisy kitchen. After breakfast, you can latch the grids together and store it on its side to have more room to prep for the next meal.
This waffle maker will make 4 waffles at once, which will get you to the kitchen table faster – and that’s always appreciated. The settings on this waffle maker are so simple that there’s no training necessary; you just slide the control to select how brown you’d like your waffles, and it will let you know when the they’re done with a green indicator light. It’s just like a toaster.

With an ultra flip design, this waffle maker expertly bakes golden brown, fluffy waffles and gives you total flipping control so you can create restaurant-quality results right at home. Make your waffle just the way you want it – lighter or darker – in just minutes. Designed for the thickest batter and most complex waffle, the Hamilton Beach® Flip Belgian Waffle Maker has Belgian-style grids with deep pockets to hold plenty of toppings. Even better, the nonstick grids are removable to go in the dishwasher for easy cleanup afterwards.


The machine works fine, but there are lots of nooks and crannies that are difficult to clean. And the noise to tell you a waffle is "done" is horrific. It's an emergency alarm type sound so every time we use it, the sound nearly sends me running out of the house with my child thinking something awful is happening. I never get used to it. And to top it off, the alert timing is wrong so it serves no functional purpose. If it had no alarm or one that could be disabled, the rating would be 4 stars.
I speak from experience: a few months ago, clear out of nowhere, I was struck by a need for homemade waffles. I had to have them—and because I live in New York City and expect immediate gratification, I proceeded directly to my local discount emporium and procured a plastic waffle iron—covered in a thin film of dust—for the sum of $16.99. Back home, I washed it and hastily set about mixing up a bowl of batter. Sadly, this story has a grim ending: even after the the requisite heating and greasing, pouring and griddling, the specimens that emerged from my iron were flabby and pale—hardly deserving of the name waffle and certainly a far cry from the feast of my dreamings.
There are a zillion waffle irons. I own a bunch of them, but my favorite is the Manning-Bowman "Twin-O-Matic" both because of its unusual design and the way that it implicitly fosters "togetherness." The "twin" was designed by Karl Ratliff explicitly for the 1939 NEW YORK WORLDS FAIR. The Twin is a direct descendant of Mr. Cole's design but with an added Art Deco zest. This unique design won world awards and is the ONLY waffle iron shown in Tony Fusco's noted "ART DECO" BOOK, Volumes 1 and 2. It consists of 2 pieces: a double TOP/BOTTOM Waffle Iron derived from the Coles patent (above) and a circular chrome plated "trunion mount" that has 2 heavy Bakelite Cradles to support the irons. It is somewhat unique because it has both a Thermometer and a Thermostat.
A related side-note: I recently made the waffles (live!) on Nom, a new video platform that allows you to live broadcast your cooking adventures. The platform was started by one of the founders of YouTube, so you know it’s good! I’ll be sharing more recipes and having more chats on our channel starting every Sunday, so be sure to subscribe to the channel get notified about scheduling. If you have any recipe or chat requests, please let me know in the comments below!
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